Annals of Thoracic Medicine
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year
: 2015  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 295-

Clinical description of human bocavirus viremia in children with lower respiratory tract infection, eastern province, Saudi Arabia


Mahmood Dhahir Al-Mendalawi 
 Department of Paediatrics, Al-Kindy College of Medicine, Baghdad University, Baghdad, Iraq

Correspondence Address:
Mahmood Dhahir Al-Mendalawi
Department of Paediatrics, Al-Kindy College of Medicine, Baghdad University, Baghdad
Iraq




How to cite this article:
Al-Mendalawi MD. Clinical description of human bocavirus viremia in children with lower respiratory tract infection, eastern province, Saudi Arabia.Ann Thorac Med 2015;10:295-295


How to cite this URL:
Al-Mendalawi MD. Clinical description of human bocavirus viremia in children with lower respiratory tract infection, eastern province, Saudi Arabia. Ann Thorac Med [serial online] 2015 [cited 2020 Sep 18 ];10:295-295
Available from: http://www.thoracicmedicine.org/text.asp?2015/10/4/295/167077


Full Text

Sir,

Bubshait et al. addressed in their interesting study that the clinical picture of human bocavirus (HBoV) infection ranged from mild to severe disease as one of them required admission to Intensive Care Unit. [1] I presume that the picture could not precisely elucidate the clinical spectrum of HBoV infection in children with lower respiratory tract infections in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). Hence, it should be cautiously interpreted. This is based on the following five points:

The size of the study population with HBoV infection was small (n = 5).The study was conducted in a single center.A high viral and bacterial prevalence rates and distinct bacterial-bacterial, viral-bacterial, and viral-viral associations have been noticed to be present in healthy children, hinting toward the complexity and potential dynamics of microbial communities in the upper respiratory tract. This warrants careful consideration when associating microbial presence with specific respiratory diseases. [2] In Bubshait et al.'s study, among five patients with HBoV viremia, one had a concomitant positive respiratory syncytial virus in the nasopharyngeal aspirate. Such viral co-infections might increase the severity of the clinical picture and the risk for hospital admission.The clinical presentation of HBoV infection depends on both viral load and the particular interaction between the host and virus. Viral loads are determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in HBoV positive samples. A direct correlation of high viral load with increasing HBoV disease severity has been noticed. [3],[4] It was not obvious whether Bubshait et al. [1] has considered in their study that correlation between viral load and HBoV infection severity.HBoV has been detected in healthy children but with a significantly lower frequency than in ill-children. [5] Considering the aforementioned remarks, there is a need to conduct large-scale multi-centers studies to better elucidate the clinical spectrum of HBoV infection as well as genome sequence analysis to get more data on the genotypic variation and molecular evolution of HBoV in KSA.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

References

1Bubshait DK, Albuali WH, Yousef AA, Obeid OE, Alkharsah KR, Hassan MI, et al. Clinical description of human bocavirus viremia in children with LRTI, Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia. Ann Thorac Med 2015;10:146-9.
2van den Bergh MR, Biesbroek G, Rossen JW, de Steenhuijsen Piters WA, Bosch AA, van Gils EJ, et al. Associations between pathogens in the upper respiratory tract of young children: Interplay between viruses and bacteria. PLoS One 2012;7:e47711.
3Zhao B, Yu X, Wang C, Teng Z, Wang C, Shen J, et al. High human bocavirus viral load is associated with disease severity in children under five years of age. PLoS One 2013;8:e62318.
4Zhou L, Zheng S, Xiao Q, Ren L, Xie X, Luo J, et al. Single detection of human bocavirus 1 with a high viral load in severe respiratory tract infections in previously healthy children. BMC Infect Dis 2014;14:424.
5García-García ML, Calvo C, Pozo F, Pérez-Breña P, Quevedo S, Bracamonte T, et al. Human bocavirus detection in nasopharyngeal aspirates of children without clinical symptoms of respiratory infection. Pediatr Infect Dis J 2008;27:358-60.